A New Breed of Con Artists

Nigerian Dating Scam – I’ve been there by Catherine Sheffield, UK I am a widow and after just over two years my friends told me to try internet dating. As I was in my 40’s I thought I would join a site for over plus dating which you pay a subscription for and I thought would be safe. I started chatting to a guy who said he was english born but his father was american. He was working for the united nations as an orthapedic surgeon which I thought was a bit of a story but I went along with it. We were chatting for a few weeks and he suggested going onto messenger as it would save money on subscriptions. He told me things like he was also a widower and told me about his wife etc. This went on for 3 months. I gave him my mobile and he rang me each evening and we would chat for 5 or 10 mins at a cost to him not me. He even rang me when I was on holiday in Spain.

Confessions of a Con Artist

The Nigerian dating scams target the lonely and vulnerable. The most common comment of victims who think they have found the love of their life is “I can’t believe I was so stupid! The Nigerian dating scams are hugely profitable. The Nigerians call them ‘maghas’ which is slang for gullible white people.

Nigerian scammers take billions of dollars every year from unsuspecting victims. To keep up their insane cash flow, they have to stay ahead of the con game. With the explosive growth of online dating, Nigerian scammers now have dating profiles.

Before you fall head over heals in love here are a few words of caution. Your new love interest may be a scammer. Romance scams are long cons; the scam artist invests lots of time and effort into the online relationship to build trust and a personal connection with the victim. This allows them to slowly and repeatedly ask for financial help. What starts as requests for a small dollar amounts to be wire transferred turns into larger and larger amounts.

Your new love interest may not ask for funds until March or April and you may not realized you have been scammed till much later. Some online romance scams have gone on for years. Scammers will either target deployed military personnel by preying on their loneliness while abroad, or they will pretend to be in the military stationed abroad and cite that as the reason they are unable to meet in person. According to the FBI: The criminals who carry out romance scams are experts at what they do.

They spend hours honing their skills and sometimes keep journals on their victims to better understand how to manipulate and exploit them. Signs your new love interest might be a scam artist Your online suitor may only be in it for the money if they: Press you to leave the dating website you met through and to communicate using personal e-mail or instant messaging; Are quick to proclaim their feelings of love; Use a photograph that looks like a glamour shot or seems overly processed; Claim to be from the U.

Scammers will find your information on a variety of platforms and can use that information to build trust or extort funds from you.

Gypsies: Kings of Con

By Denise Richardson on January 11, WAC-M takes a proactive role in the prevention of women or men becoming victimized by con artists and encourages individuals to come out from hiding and fight back to prevent repeat serial con men from harming others. Casey has set up a database that exposes known criminally convicted con men in much the same way that states list the whereabouts of convicted sex offenders.

Read about Casey’s story here. Online dating sites are popular today and regardless of whether or not you find your Mr. In today’s world of online dating, social networking and cyber crimes, it’s important to look at the risks of getting to know someone who can easily misrepresent himself or mislead you.

A woman who lost $2 million to a con artist who she fell in love with online shares her story in the hopes that others might avoid falling victim to this type of crime.

A new study has raised concern, as more children are talking to and meeting people they meet online, with dangerous consequences. When Morrison suggested that her suitor put his daughter on a plane to get better medical attention at home — and even offered to pick the girl up at the airport — a new crisis struck.

By then, Morrison knew she was dealing with a scammer. Though the amounts and details of the scam vary from victim to victim, when it comes to romance scams, the con is almost always the same: The crook wants to get a besotted victim to wire money or provide access to a credit card. If the victim doesn’t figure out the con after the first request for cash, the crook will keep milking the relationship for as much as he or she can get.

When the victim gets wise, the con artist gets scarce. To be sure, these scams aren’t new. But the increasing popularity of online dating gives them the perfect conditions to proliferate. There are no statistics saying just how common scammers are on dating sites. But individuals who frequent them say scams are pervasive.

6 red flags for online dating scams

I worked in 30 fraudulent business operations over a year period, pitching everything from gold coins to time-shares to oil and gas leases and other business opportunities. These scams took in millions of dollars. No matter how much money we made or how far-fetched the deal was, I never got caught. That is, until Sept.

This was on Biscayne Boulevard in Miami.

So you’ve met someone online and they look amazing on paper. Too good to be true? Well, they might be. While the vast majority of people you meet online are honest and well-meaning, there are a few nefarious con men (and women) trolling the Internet looking to scam money.

The Australian Securities and Investments Commission has shut down at least seven web-based investment scams since , most of them operating from the Gold Coast, a fraud hot spot. However, the scam’s masterminds are believed to be still at large, able to sell the know-how behind the scheme to new operators. The seeds of what would become Operation Ark were planted on the afternoon of Friday, September 16, last year, when a legitimate contracts for difference operator realised someone was using their name to run a scam.

Advertisement ”They had received a complaint from someone who had thought they had invested with that entity, but they had invested with Citi Index Australasia, which was a fraudulent financial services business. By submitting your email you are agreeing to Fairfax Media’s terms and conditions and privacy policy. That’s when we put in place Operation Ark. Backpackers working in the call centre telephone targets, often small business people, whose details are on mailing lists purchased from sources including commercial databases and investment seminar operators.

Advance-fee scam

One of the current schemes involves a scammer contacting someone who has an item for sale on the Internet. They ask that the seller return the difference. By the time the check clears and is discovered to be counterfeit, the seller is out a couple thousand dollars. The target is usually a person selling a relatively expensive item on the Internet, or possibly even in newspaper classified ads.

The difference may be several thousand dollars. The counterfeits are generally of excellent quality and may even fool the bank initially.

Matt the Knife (): American-born con artist, card cheat and pickpocket who, from the ages of approximately 14 through 21, bilked dozens of casinos, corporations and at least one Mafia crime family.

For others, however, it can be a life-ruining decision — leaving us penniless, heartbroken and with many more problems heading our way. The only way to avoid an online romance scam is to be aware of their occurrences and also to know how to spot them before they begin. When you start talking to someone on the internet, pay particular attention to the messages that they are sending.

Are the messages answering the questions that you are asking or are they just generic messages that could be sent to anyone with just one minor change for each — the name? Prolific romance scam artists will generally use the same messages for everyone that they are trying to lure in as victims so if the messages are too general for your liking, back away as fast as you can.

They are so generic that you can often find much of what they write by searching on Google. Even on profiles, the text can be copied and pasted from that found on other dating sites. Consider the language the person is using. Poor English can be a red flag signal for you to at least be more circumspect until you know more about this person. Many of the scam artists come from countries where English isn’t the first language and their command of it in writing is poor; bad grammar and spelling can be an indicator that the person may not be genuine.

New Fraud Watch Network Campaign Informs Americans About Social Media Scams

Email Sh’reen Morrison had been on an online dating site for only a few weeks before she realized that something was seriously wrong with the man who had been actively pursuing her by text message and email. They’d hit it off right away, and he said he lived just outside of Phoenix, which seemed relatively proximate to a woman in remote Yuma, Ariz. But meeting in person was always a problem. First, he was traveling through India with his daughter.

Then the daughter became ill and had to be hospitalized. When Morrison suggested that her suitor put his daughter on a plane to get better medical attention at home — and even offered to pick the girl up at the airport — a new crisis struck.

May 08,  · Online Dating Cons and Scams. Updated on February 9, Marcy Goodfleisch. more. Marcy has researched and written about relationships, domestic issues, dating, and con-artists for more than a decade. Contact Author. The con artist will keep draining the victim as long as possible. The groundwork for travel cons involves you sending them Reviews:

You see an Internet offer for a free one-month trial of some amazing product—often a teeth whitener or a weight-loss program. So the companies spell out the numbers, with no dollar signs; anything that has to do with money or a time frame gets washed into the text. It could be free, or it could resemble a pay service like Boingo Wireless. You get connected, and everything seems fine. The site only looks legitimate. Fake Wi-Fi hot spots are cropping up everywhere, and it can be difficult to tell them from the real thing.

Click on the link for the Wi-Fi network you’re currently using. A box with a “General” tab should pop up. Look for https in the URL, or check the lower right-hand corner of your browser for a small padlock icon. Learn more about how to disable automatic Wi-Fi connections. Scammers are taking advantage of URL-shortening services that allow Twitter users to share links that would otherwise be longer than the character maximum for a tweet.

Older singles lose millions in online dating scams